Fashion News, Regency-Style

November 20, 2012 at 8:41 pm (books, diaries, entertainment, fashion, history, jane austen, portraits and paintings, research) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

In today’s mail a copy of A Lady of Fashion: Barbara Johnson’s Album of Styles and Fabrics; this is a book LONG on my wish list and I finally broke down and obtained a copy. In wonderful shape! Can’t wait to have a sit down, drink a cup of tea, and really look and read.

For those unfamiliar with Barbara Johnson, her album is at the Victoria & Albert Museum – a great favorite with me when in London. They do have an online look at the album, into which Barbara pasted and pinned fashion plates and actual fabric samples for clothing she had made up:

This page shows some of Barbara’s descriptions, fabrics and pictures. I talked about this book way back in 2008!

Sabina at Kleidung um 1800 shared some wonder “fan-cheers” about the book – I’ll see if she’d mind my posting them. She has a unique view on the book, given you interest in costume. You will find a project “to die-for”: Sabine has been working on an 1806 Spencer worn by Queen Luise of Prussia. Just FAB-U-LOUS!

Colonial Williamsburg has a useful site containing fashion plates.

More about Barbara Johnson’s Album at Barbara Brackman’s Material Culture blogspot.

Regency History has fashion plates from La Belle Assemblée.

See the list of Ackermann’s Repository of Arts here on Two Teens in the Time of Austen.

Portrait Miniatures to give you added incentive can be found at Ellison Fine Art.

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Jane Austen Fashion II: Spring!

March 22, 2011 at 10:04 pm (entertainment, fashion) (, , , , , , )

March has supposedly brought with it the first day of spring: we had better weather BEFORE the official “first day” than afterwards! That’s Vermont for you…

So let’s look at a “spring” fashion — for the year 1815:

This “Walking Dress,” from Ackermann’s Repository of Arts, is described as:

“Pelisse of short walking length, made of evening primrose-coloured velvet, ornamented down the front with satin trimming; round capes, trimmed to correspond; full lace ruff. A French bonnet, composed of white velvet and satin in reversed plaitings, trimmed round the edge with a quilting of lace; full plume of ostrich feathers in the front. Half-boots of tan-coloured kid. Gloves, Limerick or York tan.”

and later, this interesting attribution: “For the fashions for this month we are again indebted to the tasteful and elegant designs of Mrs. Bean, of Albemarle-street.”

As mentioned in my earlier post, any information on the said Mrs. Bean would be most welcome!

The Smiths and Goslings, living at their London residences on Portland Place, would still have been in the city when spring officially came. This time, up to Easter, was busy-busy-busy with concerts and parties. A fascinating period to study, I must confess…

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