Bonhams: Jane Austen’s Letter 88

October 27, 2019 at 11:14 am (jane austen, news, Uncategorized) (, , , )

This is a further update to two posts:

Although I watched the auction online and was witnessing the climb and climb in price, the “at the hammer” price did NOT INCLUDE the premium paid to Bonhams. Now comes “news” (ie, not news at all) that the auction of Letter 88 of Jane Austen from the Dodge Collection “sold for a new record”: $200,075.

It is any wonder no one cared to forewarn entities like the Jane Austen House Museum, as Kathryn Sutherland advocated, in order to come to terms prior to a public auction?

NPG 3630; Jane Austen by Cassandra Austen

From The Guardian article (7 Oct 2019):

“Sutherland said that ‘because of specific domestic details within it, it would have by far the greatest resonance inside the collection held by Jane Austen’s House Museum in the cottage where Austen lived and wrote’.

Earlier this year, the museum launched a crowdfunding campaign to help it raise the £35,000 it needed to buy a snippet of a letter written by Austen in 1814. …

Sutherland said it was particularly sad that publicly funded organisations like Jane Austen’s House Museum were unable to compete with international commercial buyers, ‘because so few Austen letters are retained for public benefit in British institutions’.

Considering that Britain has in the past disallowed artifacts to leave its shores, should the Dodge Austen letter be allowed to leave the U.S.? One entity that I thought should have partaken in the Battle for Letter 88 was The Morgan Library & Museum – the owner of a substantial collection of Austen letters. How about “retained for the public benefit in American institutions”?

JA to Cass 16 Sept 1813_Bonhams4

Deborah Yaffe commented on this idea of a “home country” for Austen letters, this one in particular, in her blog post “Going, going…”

That its cost beat the auction estimate – $80,000 to $100,000 – was a no brainer even as it was affixed to the catalogue. Austen is “hot property,” a growing phenomenon ever since Darcy’s wet shirt…

Even ratty Victorian paperbacks – I’m in the midst of reading Janine Barchas’ book The Lost Books of Jane Austen (purchased after the Williamsburg AGM after her “highlight” plenary presentation “The Lost Copies Northanger Abbey” – sell for much more than the proverbial “song” when they’ve got JANE AUSTEN attached to them.

Let’s face it, Austen is priced out of the reach of most institutions. Without knowing the depth of coffers (or generous donors) some like The British Library or Oxford University or, yes, the Morgan, have recourse to, it is guesswork only.

What I want to know is, Who Bought Jane Austen?

Maybe it was singer, TV host Kelly Clarkson! The letter sold for less than the ring AND it’s already in the U.S.

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Follow the Auction – Bonhams Online

October 23, 2019 at 12:00 pm (jane austen) (, , , )

Auction for the sale “Fine Books and Manuscripts, Including the Dodge Family Autograph Collection, Natural History, Travel and Americana” begins at 1 PM Eastern (US) Time.

Bonhams has a “watch live” link!

For the Sale in general – Bonhams link.

For the special “watch live” link – Bonhams watch live link.

Bonhams catalogue for the sale can be viewed online or downloaded or ordered(see bottom of page).

Austen is Lot 5. Will she sell? For how much? and most importantly: To Whom?

JA to Cass 16 Sept 1813_Bonhams4

The amount of items is interesting, as is the Dodges’ areas of collection.

I recollect watching an auction in which a diary of an Austen (early) neighbor; the lots went by QUITE swiftly. Of course, I had JUST missed the lot I was interested in seeing (by the time I found the link and got it working). So, “start watching” early!

RESULTS (1.15 PM)

I joined the auction late – 1.08 PM; Austen was already in the spotlight!! (So I do not know the starting bid…).

Even at that moment, the bidding was standing at $90,000 – to an online bidder. According to the auctioneer, it was a Battle of TWO Online Bidders.

As mentioned, they move swiftly from lot to lot; with little chatter about each lot. Bidders can be in the room; on the phone; online; absentee.

As I watched the bids went up in increments of $10,000….

$90,000…

$100,000…

$110,000…

$120,000… [about this time we learned two bidders, both online]

$130,000…

$150,000… (I might have missed a bid here, not sure…)

Bonhams at the Hammer

$160,000… At the hammer – to paddle #5060. Of course, out-distancing its estimate ($80,000-$120,000). As was expected, by me at least.

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11,000 Pounds Buys Jane Austen Collectable

October 23, 2013 at 7:30 pm (jane austen, people) (, , , )

edward austen and jane autographs

Of special concern for Two Teens in the Time of Austen: a book that went up for auction at Gorringes today:

Jane Austen, “An autograph manuscript fragment, comprising four lines, attached to another leaf bearing authentication, in turn attached to a letter from her nephew, James Edward Austen-Leigh, written on paper bearing watermark date 1868, at Bray Vicarage, February 7, 1870, presenting the fragment to Rev. G. C. Berkeley”.

Estimate before the sale: £2,000-3,000. As the hammer dropped, the cost closed at £11,000!!

Click on the photo for full auction details and more photos.

The note, letter, and authentication are attached to a copy of Edward’s book, A Memoir of Jane Austen.

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Austen’s Watsons at Auction – July 14th

July 13, 2011 at 5:15 pm (books, news, people) (, , , , )

Have you ever wanted to OWN your own Jane Austen manuscript?

The Watsons, an unfinished Austen manuscript, goes on the block tomorrow at Sotheby’s. Read The Guardian‘s article on the sale here. The Wall Street Journal has a picture of one manuscript page! (And some interesting text.)

Ah, it just kills me to read of the manuscript currently existing in two separate places (NYC’s Morgan museum owns the first 12 pages – sold off by the family-member owner during World War I); and even worse, the notice that some pages disappeared while it was in the custody of the University of London!

But was a FASCINATING thing to read about Austen making her paper into booklets — indeed mirroring a BOOK:

“… the manuscript has 68 pages – hand-trimmed by Austen – which have been split up into 11 booklets. …. Austen took a piece of paper, cut it in two and then folded over each half to make eight-page booklets. Then she would write, small neat handwriting leaving little room for corrections – of which there are many. ‘You can really see the mind at work with all the corrections and revisions,’ said Heaton. At one stage she crosses so much out that she starts a page again and pins it in. It seems, in Austen’s mind, her manuscript had to look like a book.”

I hate to say, looking at the page image: she left a LOT of room for corrections! Quite a neat thing to see.

Sotheby’s is estimating it will sell for £200,000-300,000. How Jane herself would have enjoyed that kind of money!

 

Read the “catalogue notes & provenance” section – the Morgan paid only a little over £317!

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