Follow the Auction – Bonhams Online

October 23, 2019 at 12:00 pm (jane austen) (, , , )

Auction for the sale “Fine Books and Manuscripts, Including the Dodge Family Autograph Collection, Natural History, Travel and Americana” begins at 1 PM Eastern (US) Time.

Bonhams has a “watch live” link!

For the Sale in general – Bonhams link.

For the special “watch live” link – Bonhams watch live link.

Bonhams catalogue for the sale can be viewed online or downloaded or ordered(see bottom of page).

Austen is Lot 5. Will she sell? For how much? and most importantly: To Whom?

JA to Cass 16 Sept 1813_Bonhams4

The amount of items is interesting, as is the Dodges’ areas of collection.

I recollect watching an auction in which a diary of an Austen (early) neighbor; the lots went by QUITE swiftly. Of course, I had JUST missed the lot I was interested in seeing (by the time I found the link and got it working). So, “start watching” early!

RESULTS (1.15 PM)

I joined the auction late – 1.08 PM; Austen was already in the spotlight!! (So I do not know the starting bid…).

Even at that moment, the bidding was standing at $90,000 – to an online bidder. According to the auctioneer, it was a Battle of TWO Online Bidders.

As mentioned, they move swiftly from lot to lot; with little chatter about each lot. Bidders can be in the room; on the phone; online; absentee.

As I watched the bids went up in increments of $10,000….

$90,000…

$100,000…

$110,000…

$120,000… [about this time we learned two bidders, both online]

$130,000…

$150,000… (I might have missed a bid here, not sure…)

Bonhams at the Hammer

$160,000… At the hammer – to paddle #5060. Of course, out-distancing its estimate ($80,000-$120,000). As was expected, by me at least.

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Naval Journal, 1858-1859

April 6, 2016 at 6:22 pm (diaries, history, news) (, , , )

rawson journal

As always, finding an item LONG after it’s been sold at auction. Today’s find was this journal, written by Harry Holdsworth Rawson, aboard HMS Calcutta. Of interest to ME because young Rawson (only fourteen years old) was under Admiral Sir Michael Seymour, Richard Seymour’s brother. Richard’s diary, of course, has mention of his seafaring brother (and the wife & children left behind in England) – but, like mentions of his father (also Sir Michael Seymour), they are mainly of leaves or letters.

I’ve heard a little about Michael on shipboard, mainly because some of the children of Richard Seymour and John Culme-Seymour were aboard with him. How thrilling to hear of such a precious relic.

Would be interested to hear if anyone knows the present whereabouts of this journal, sold at Bonham’s on 19 March 2014.

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What was Jane Austen Reading?

December 3, 2014 at 11:55 am (entertainment, jane austen) (, , )

A Bonhams auction this past summer sold a dated (January 1811) Jane Austen signature for over £23,000! The auction house contends the paper indicates this once was written on the “flyleaf of a book”:

jane austen signature

So my question is, What was Jane Austen reading? Would LOVE to know if there is some book out there that once had her signature in it, which got clipped away in some “collector’s enthusiasm” — for wouldn’t the BOOK and SIGNATURE, together, have been of greater value (several meanings to that word)?

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Maria Culme Seymour, miniature by Ross

July 28, 2013 at 12:50 pm (diaries, fashion, history, people, portraits and paintings, research) (, , , , , , , , )

I’ve written before about finding this darling miniature of Maria Smith AKA Lady Culme Seymour; but last night I took the opportunity to RELOOK at Bonhams auction site, because a letter I’ve given scant attention to actually mentions THIS VERY image!

It is the end of November, 1844; Maria and John Culme Seymour have been married since February; the visitor is Mamma Smith, and she is writing, jointly, to daughters Emma and Eliza:

“Maria sang too; she … played her part [ie, of hostess] very well; conversed with animation, was polite to all, & looked happy: she looked young & pretty, with Curls; looked quite like Ross’s picture.”

That comment alone tells me that Mamma thought the portrait a fair likeness of her youngest daughter!

As you can see, when you go to Bonhams, they have a “similar items” area in the lower right corner; in this case, other portraits done by Sir William Charles Ross, RA.

Among them is this portrait, simply described as “of a Lady”. As you know, such terminology kills me.

Ross_a Lady-closeup

A sweet, yet slightly melancholy face, wouldn’t you say. The description is short: “A Lady, standing in a landscape and wearing black dress and white underslip, a pink rose at her corsage [sic?], jeweled belt, olive green shawl draped about her shoulders, her hair upswept into a knot, the front centrally parted and curled in ringlets framing her face, holding periwinkles in her right hand. Gilt-mounted within brown leather travelling case lined with velvet.” She sold for £2000 in a May 2013 auction (and was earlier sold through Christie’s, in 1979).

Who could she be??

_I_ am looking for a “missing” Ross portrait: of Fanny Seymour. Richard Seymour (who also sat to the artist in April 1836), wrote in his diary of Ross’s visit to Kinwarton on the 22nd to paint Fanny in September 1836; and on the 28th, he says:

“Mr. Ross has finished a miniature of dearest Fanny – w:h quite satisfies me – and I have just paid him £30. viz: £26..5 for the Min: and £3..15 for the frame & case, yet to come. X Giving him a £5 note and checque on Curries for £25. This piece of self indulgence will I hope be pardoned in me –“

Now compare the above to Maria, which Mamma seems to agree is a good likeness:

Maria Culme-Seymour2

Not the same person, but could they be sisters? And yet compare to their Sister-in-law Frances (Seymour) Smith (Spencer Smith’s wife), another miniature by Ross dating to the mid-1830s (this a later “copy”):

Smith_FrancesSeymour-MagdalenaRoss_1836-1911copy

While not as engaging as this slyly-smiling Frances Smith, one almost wonders a bit: Could it be her?

Ah, I mourn that the sitter of the Bonhams Ross miniature may go through life forever more as “A Lady”. If only Richard had written something about what Fanny wore, or how she  was posed.

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