Fun with Astrology

February 4, 2014 at 9:34 pm (entertainment, fashion) (, , , , , , , , )

A few weeks ago Charlotte Frost and I were discussing make-up –> Regency era, tutorials, reenactors, &c &c. Last week I watched — and greatly enjoyed — this video by Rochelle & Olivia:

marie antoinette

So it was with a bit of a “hoot n’holler” that I read last week’s horoscope for my star-sign, Aquarius (at 7 Days, a local (Vermont) weekly):

Extravagant wigs became fashionable for a while in 18th-century England. They could soar as high as four feet above a woman’s head. Collections of fruit might be arrayed in the mass of hair, along with small replicas of gardens, taxidermically stuffed birds and model ships. I would love to see you wear something like that in the coming week.”

Charlotte had a couple more links; promise to look them up and post them later!

duchess plaza toro

My favorite “Lady who let a ship go to her head”:
the Duchess of Plaza Toro
1983 Stratford (Ontario)
The Gondoliers: Douglas Chamberlain

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Finding a Voice: Diane Jacobs on ‘Abigail Adams and her Sisters’

April 4, 2013 at 12:59 pm (books, diaries, europe, history, jasna, people, research) (, , , , , , )

Looking for information about the Leon Levy Center for Biography (CUNY), I came across notice of this past lecture by Diane Jacobs:

adams_jacobs

What leapt off the screen was the idea that Jacobs solved the problem of “finding a voice for each of her protagonists”. TWO TEENS IN THE TIME OF AUSTEN, while focused on Emma Smith and Mary Gosling, has the proverbial cast of thousands: Emma had 8 siblings; Mary, 6; in-laws for all those siblings who married add significantly to the count; parents and grandparents, especially ‘Mamma’ – Augusta Smith, and papa William Gosling; and all the relatives, friends, and neighbors who populate the letters and diaries.

Whew! rather like the chorus of a Gilbert & Sullivan extravaganza: “his sisters and his cousins, whom he reckons up by dozens, and his aunts“.

Jacobs also discussed “finding a way to distribute her attention between the one famous and the two unknown sisters” (for the record, Abigail’s sisters were Mary Smith Cranch and Elizabeth Smith Shaw Peabody). I have the problem of a super-well-represented sister (Emma Austen Leigh), several under-represented siblings, and a dying-for-more protagonist (Lady Smith). I believe there are primary materials out there, as yet “un(re)discovered”: more diaries and certainly more letters.

At least I don’t have to deal with “John Adams, who is not a main character, and yet so profoundly affects everyone else”! Although, I must ‘insinuate’ the historical since the “times” my ladies lived through are so eventful.

Wish I could have been in the audience at one of the several similar lectures Diane Jacobs gave last fall. And wish her book was already completed and out! I’d dearly love to read it. My own brush with Abigail Adams comes from her delightful letters sent home (to those sisters) from England and France. I even used her letters in a Jane Austen-related JASNA lecture.

I’ve a couple blog posts on Abigail Adams:

Check out the new material at the Massachusetts Historical Society’s digital edition of The Adam Papers, or read Abigail’s letters to her sisters!

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