Miss Clephane’s “Miss Stanhope”

April 23, 2017 at 6:25 pm (books, estates, people, research) (, , , )

Letters at Castle Ashby, according to the book The History of the Comptons of Compton Wynyates, put a certain “Miss Stanhope” at the eye of the storm during the lengthy courtship of Emma’s cousin Lord Compton and the eldest of the three Clephane daughters of Torloisk, Margaret Douglas Maclean Clephane, in circa 1813. The girls come into the purview of the Smiths once there is actually an engagement – in 1815! Yes, it took that long; Lord Compton moved at a snail’s pace, even after confessing to his mother that he was wishing to marry Miss Clephane.

It is always so nice when further information appears – especially when from an old book. The Letter-bag of Lady Elizabeth Stanhope is indeed related to the Stanhopes known by the future Lady Compton. She even appears – only once – though under the name “Lady Crompton”.

[just in case the U of California’s volumes disappear or are incomplete, there are other volumes available; beware of “new” reprints with limited accessibility]

Marianne Stanhope

The eldest Miss Stanhope, Marianne, was born on 23 May 1786 “about 7 o’clock in the morning” (writes her mother) in their house in Grosvenor Square, London. She was therefore a few years older than Margaret (born in 1791). It was her brother, whose life we follow through his sister’s letters in The Letter-bag, John Spencer-Stanhope who succeeded father Walter to the estate of Cannon Hall, Yorkshire. Marianne married later in life: March 1828 saw her become the wife of Robert Hudson of Tadworth Court (near Reigate). She died (aged 76) in 1862. [An age Lady Compton (later the 2nd Marchioness of Northampton) never attained. Margaret died in 1830.]

The wonderful silhouette of Marianne comes from the book; and her sisters (and Mother) are also represented!

Stanhope_Anne

Anne Stanhope has such a characterful face! She “was born September 7th, 1788, between 6 & 8 in the Morning at Cannon Hall”. Anne never married. She died (aged 72) in 1860.

Stanhope_Isabella

Isabella Stanhope, their “eleventh Child, was born on the 20th of October 1797, at one in the morning”. She, too, never married. She lived until 1857 (aged 60).

Stanhope_Frances

Frances Mary Stanhope, child number 13, was, like her eldest sister, born in Grosvenor Square, “on the 27th of June, 1800, at 1/2 past twelve at Noon”. She lived until the age of 85, and also lived in the state of blessed singleness.

Stanhope_Maria

Maria Alicia Stanhope “was born at Cannon Hall,” like several of her sisters, “the 4th of September 1802, 1/2 before seven in the Morning”. Maria died the year before Frances (in 1884), aged 82. She, too, never married.

  • Much from the Cannon Hall archives can be found at Bradford’s West Yorkshire Archive Service, including many of the letters included in The Letter-bag of Lady Elizabeth Stanhope – who, by the way, married the heir.
  • Claimed as the “bosom friend” of Margaret Clephane, Miss Stanhope and others of the Spencer-Stanhope family appear from time to time in Smith & Gosling family correspondence. Their own correspondence, as edited by A.M.W. Stirling is highly recommended.
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Emma’s “London Season,” 1816

September 12, 2013 at 1:24 am (diaries, entertainment, history, london's landscape, research) (, , , , , , , , )

sisters

Among the fascinating insights in Emma’s diary, are the “delights” of a London Season. I picked out some of the festivities mentioned in the Season during 1816 to write about — and to records as a YouTube video. It’s also a video I’ve uploaded to my Amazon page. The text originally published in JASNA News.

Some Highlights:

  • Soirees & Concerts
  • attending Drury Lane (and Jane Austen writing about Kean)
  • painting with Margaret Meen (tutor to Queen Charlotte and the princesses)
  • the Antient Music concert series
  • teas & parties
  • Grand Party at No. 5 Portland Place [inactive link; site taken down]
  • wedding of Princess Charlotte of Wales to Prince Leopold
  • Cosi fan tutte, with Madame Fodor

grand party

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Regency London

September 2, 2011 at 12:03 pm (books, fashion, london's landscape) (, , , , , , , )

Gotta love it when you’re reading a novel and suddenly you are transported back in time.

I have made mention before that Jane Austen’ s novels are a great source for “life as lived” by people like the Smiths and Goslings. Never mind that Emma Smith later (1828) married James Edward Austen, Jane’s nephew!

Anyway, in preparation for the JASNA AGM, I’ve been re-reading Sense and Sensibility — which was published 200 years ago (1811-2011) — and came across a couple of passages that seem to breath “life” into similar scenes that must really have happened. Recalling my post of Mrs Gosling’s party, it’s just thrilling to read about Marianne and Elinor:

They arrived in due time at the place of destination, and as soon as the string of carriages before them would allow, alighted, ascended the stairs, heard their names announced form one landing-place to another in an audible voice, and entered a room splendidly lit up, quite full of company, and insufferably hot. When they had paid their tribute of politeness by curtseying to the lady of the house, they were permitted to mingle in the crowd, and take their share of the heat and inconvenience, to which their arrival must necessarily add. “

Augusta Smith (Emma’s eldest sister) spoke of the press of people when she went to court to be presented; this passage from Sense and Sensibility ably targets the “wonder” of one’s arrival — but also what awaited in rooms filled with hundreds of people!

Read about Mrs Gosling’s parties here.

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