Elizabeth and Langham Christie: a relic of Preston Deanery

August 8, 2012 at 7:50 pm (history, news, people, research) (, , , , , )

A stroll through google brought this unusual “find”:

I must admit that – lookswise – this is not my favorite piece at this 2007 Christie’s auction, but if it once held the clothing of Elizabeth (née Gosling) or Langham Christie, then it holds special place in my heart.

The lot description gives why its provenance dates back to Langham Christie: “the back of the base section with fabric label inscribed ‘Christie Esq.‘ and depository label for (T)ilbury’s, Marylebone, inscribed ‘Langham Christie, Esq. Preston Deanery No 3 Northampton Per Worcester & Stubb Boat‘(?).”

It’s a large piece: 93 1/2 high x 55 1/2 wide x 22 3/4 deep.

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Mary’s elder sister, Elizabeth Gosling was born in 1798. In Mary’s diaries Elizabeth is NEVER named; she is only ever “My Sister“. Mrs Smith confesses in a letter that she had seen the romance blossoming, and she for one wasn’t surprised when Langham  Christie proposed! The couple married in the summer of 1829.

Although Langham eventually inherited Glyndebourne, the couple made their home at Preston Deanery. Their son, William Langham Christie, began the Christie inhabitation of the future “opera-loving” estate.

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Light Housekeeping

September 12, 2010 at 11:17 am (research) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Do take a moment to check out a few new *pages*. I’ve created one page about various “missing” parts of this research, as well as acknowledged those that have come to light in private hands (special thank you to people who have contacted me; and to Alan, who continues to send scans as he finds new letters).

Readers will find all the page links under CAN YOU HELP (see PAGES, to the right), but the most important is the one entitled Where are these items?

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NB: I worked on these pages while listening to the LAST NIGHT OF THE PROMS, on Vermont Public Radio. Oh, to be in London again…

The Smiths & Goslings would have been EXACTLY the type to subscribe to such concerts year after year after year (lucky people, no?). One thought: the London Season in their day would NOT have been the hot summer months, but the winter months of January/February through spring (depending on when Easter fell); the plays, parties and operas continued for the Smiths & Goslings into the month of June.

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