Regency Costume Fashion Plates

January 12, 2012 at 12:38 pm (entertainment, fashion, history, people, portraits and paintings, research) (, , , , , , , , , , )

Sabine — who’s excellent blog, Kleidungum1800, you just must check out! — has unearthed a terrific series of fashion plates on Flikr. I took a quick peep at just one – a collection of 99 photos (wow!) from 1803-1804, or, as the collection comes from the Bibliothèque des Arts Décoratifs, when dealing with those that are French  plates: from the Year 12. (Dear Napoleon!)

As you can see from the little screen shot (right), the plates include fashions for both men and women.

The page claims it’s “A Work In Progress” – and what work it all entails! Plans for the beginning uploads include fashions from 1800-1820, as well as the American Civil War period (c1855-64).

We owe a debt to user “Nuranar”. Thank you, Danke, Merci!

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I can see the Two Elizas (Eliza Chute & Eliza Gosling) being interested in this little number,
they did so love reading the Letters of Mme de Sévigné (en français)!

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Mary and Emma would have use for either of these beauties,
especially if the evening included one of Mrs Gosling’s balls

Read more about the “crush” at a Mrs. Gosling’s ball, c1816

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Sir William Knighton at Carlton House

April 13, 2011 at 9:16 pm (books, news, people) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , )

In “conversation” with author CHARLOTTE FROST, whose biography on Sir William Knighton is on bookstore shelves now, she wrote the following comment about Mrs Gosling’s ball:

“No Sir William and Lady Knighton at Mrs Gosling’s Ball! Knighton was once spotted at the Children’s Ball at Carlton House, but unaccompanied by any of his children.”

The one caveat I might have — given that the guests numbered over 200 persons and the newspaper reported so few of those guests — is, if Sir William and Lady Knighton were in town that May of 1816 I wouldn’t wonder that they were present. Why? The Goslings had their own “royal” connections. But, for now, we can only surmise…

To get back to Charlotte Frost—

Searching for Sir William information, I came across this little tidbit:

9th December Friends of Havant Museum

5 months ago on The Mayor of Havant
Tonight I had been invited to the Friends of Havant Museum Christmas Meeting at The Spring. As the Mayor of Havant I automatically become a Patron for my Mayoral Year. There was a very interesting speaker Miss Charlotte Frost who gave a talk entitled A courtier’s virtuous retirement; Sir William Knighton at Blendworth 1820-1836.
 
Lucky were those in the audience that evening!
 
And lucky will be readers of Two Teens in the Time of Austen: We’ll be “in conversation” with Ms. Frost in my next posting! In the meantime, take a look at her new biography: Sir William Knighton: The strange Career of a Regency Physician.
 
You can obtain a copy through authorsonline (1) e-book or (2) paperback; also available via Amazon.co.uk. If you like to support independent booksellers, why not order through my favorite in Nantwich, England: Nantwich Bookshop!

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1816 Fashion, at Mrs Gosling’s Ball

April 9, 2011 at 12:17 pm (entertainment, fashion, portraits and paintings, research) (, , )

A companion piece to our discussion of Mrs Gosling’s May 1816 ball. Here is an “evening dress” from Ackermann’s May issue of the Repository, described as:

A white satin slip, over which is a white lace dress, ornamented with three quillings of white lace on the skirt, intermixed with bows of white satin ribbon. The body and sleeve, both of which are richly ornamented with coloured stones, are formed, as our readers will see by the print, in a very novel style. Head-dress, a cap composed of white satin, finished with a band edged with pearls, and a superb plume of white feathers. Necklace, ear-rings, and bracelets, colored with pearls. White satin slippers, and white kid gloves.

I simply could not resist a close-up of this enchanting head-dress:

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What if you threw a PARTY – and everyone came?!

April 3, 2011 at 1:01 pm (entertainment, news, people, places) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

My first clue was Emma’s 1816 diary, in which she writes:

May 2, Thursday,  Mama & Augusta went to Mrs Goslings ball & supper

This ball made headlines! From the Morning Post for 4 May 1816:

Mrs. William Gosling’s Ball.
A very splendid Ball and Supper were given by that distinguished luminary in the fashionable world, on Thursday night, in Portland-place. The superb mansion put on all its attractions. The outer and inner hall were decorated with flowers and exotic plants.

The magnificent staircase was lighted up with crystal lamps; the Ball-room illuminated by costly chandeliers and lustres. The latter apartment was of great extent, in consequence of the whole suit [sic: suite] of rooms being thrown into one, through the medium of the folding doors, acting upon a retiring principle. The floor was admirably decorated by that skilful artist, Mr. ELMSMORE; it represented flowers in wreaths, and figures.

Dancing commenced at eleven o’clock, led off by Mr. PAULET and the accomplished Miss GOSLING {Elizabeth Gosling, Mary’s eldest sister; the future Mrs Langham Christie}. About fifteen couples followed. Waltzing was also introduced. At two o’clock, the company adjourned to the supper-room. Here was a matchless specimen of taste and elegance.

Every decorative ornament was used to give zest to a most excellent banquet consisting of every delicacy. Covers were laid in three rooms on the ground floor, for two hundred and ten persons. The party exceeding that number, an apartment on the first floor was set apart for the supernumeraries, exceeding fifty. [so, in reality, 260+ people attended!]

The dancing recommenced at three o’clock, and was kept up with proper spirit until six; after this a dejeune was served up in the best possible style. At seven in the morning the company separated.

An even-more-splendid write-up appears the following year (again in the Morning Post), 23 April 1817:
Mrs. Gosling’s Ball.
 A Waltz and Quadrille Ball was given in Portland-place, on Monday evening, to a circle of fashionables, exceeding 300 in number. As the mansion is one of the best built, and the best furnished, in that quarter of the town, it appeared, of course, when brilliantly lighted up, and filled with an assemblage of beautiful women, elegantly dressed, to great advantage. There were three drawing-rooms thrown open, pannelled with mirrors, from the ceiling to the floor; the fourth room attracted its share of admiration; it was one of the prettiest boudoirs in the town, fitted up with extraordinary taste. This room was appropriated for cards. Dancing commenced at a quarter past eleven, led off by the accomplished Miss GOSLING and a Military Gentleman, whose name we could not learn. Several sets danced in the saloon. On the ground floor, the library and great eating-room were thrown open; they are highly enriched by the most rare productions in nature and art; the pictures are particularly deserving of praise, being all chefs d’oeuvre of the old master. At half-past four this delightful treat concluded. A sandwich supper was given. There were present the following leaders in gay life, viz.:—
 
Well, that lengthy paragraph my tired little fingers will let your tired little eyes peruse! And now a gallop to the finish: 
 
The outer and inner halls, and the grand staircase were illuminated in a nouvelle and pleasing style. A prodigious quantity of flowering shrubs decorated the recesses.. In short, nothing was wanting to give effect to the scene.
Whew…
Maybe next I should mention a few little details about Mrs. William Gosling, née the Hon. Charlotte de Grey.
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The above illustration is from Ackermann’s Repository for May 1816.
Read Charlotte Gosling’s guest list:

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